The Oral History Project

Slide 1 - Oral History

Jill Campbell

Senior VP of Operations, Cox Communications

Hosted by Seth Arenstein

Slide 2 - Amy Maclean

Hosted By Lela Cocoros

Amy Maclean

Nick Davatzes

Editorial Director of Cablefax, Access Intelligence

Slide - Oral History

Congratulations Bresnan Award Winner

Nick Davatzes

Nick Davatzes

2001 Cable Center Oral History Interview, New York City.

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Hauser Oral History Collection

First-hand video/audio histories from the innovators and entrepreneurs who built the connectivity industry and inspire its future. This is the only source for hundreds of remarkable stories from cable operators, programmers, engineers, financiers, and content creators.

Oral Histories: Voices Who Inspire

First-hand video/audio histories from the innovators and entrepreneurs who built the connectivity industry and inspire its future. This is the only source for hundreds of remarkable stories from cable operators, programmers, engineers, financiers, and content creators.

Since The Cable Center began, we have gathered the stories of the visionaries and leaders whose work points the way to what’s next in the connectivity industry. Personal anecdotes and observations add valuable color and context that aren’t often available in third-party accounts.

More than 360 video and audio histories connect the industry’s past to its present and future. New stories are added every year to the only repository of first-hand stories from the industry’s creators.

Among the giants whose stories are captured:

1
John Walson, who began wiring his hometown of Mahoney City, Penn., for cable in 1948 and then went on to form Service Electric Cable TV and Communications. Recorded in 1970, Walson’s is the oldest interview in the Hauser Oral History Collection.
2
Ted Turner, who took a small, independent TV station in Atlanta and turned it into one of the industry’s largest content providers. “It’s pretty hard to get rich without having fun unless you’re robbing a bank,” he said. “We didn’t do that. We earned our money the good, old-fashioned way; we earned it.”
3
John Sie, who emigrated from his native China to the U.S. via a cargo ship. His Chinese name was Shie Jungong and he did not speak any English when he landed on U.S. soil. John Malone introduced Sie to the cable business, and his successful career took him to Jerrold Electronics, Showtime, and Tele-Communications Inc., and the founding of Starz Entertainment LLC.
4
Tom Freston, who helped introduce MTV (Music Television) after living in Asia, the Middle East and Mexico. “They wouldn’t hire anyone from the conventional television business, so they were hiring school teachers, beatniks − all kinds of odds and ends. I fit right in,” Freston said. He went on to run MTV Networks.

Ways to Listen

Access to our oral history collection expands as technology changes. Listen to podcasts. Or learn about the creation of the cable modem and how it changed society.

Project Creator: Gus Hauser

The Cable Center’s Hauser Oral History project was made possible by a $1 million gift from Gustave M. Hauser, a long-time cable executive who was the President of Warner Cable during its first 10 years, after which he formed Hauser Communications. His myriad philanthropic endeavors included a passion for preserving the stories of the industry’s birth and evolution.

Oral Histories Search

Oral Histories